Amsterdam Metro’s North-South line officially opened

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Entrance of Amsterdam Central station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.
Entrance of Amsterdam Central station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.

Amsterdam’s first female mayor Femke Halsema has inaugurated the Dutch capital’s new North-South line within the first few days of starting her new role.

The 10km line passes beneath the IJ river and was officially opened at a ceremony on July 21 with Amsterdam transport minister Sharon Dijksma in attendance.

North-South line – also known as Line 52 – is an idea that dates back to the 1960s.

Rokin station. Photo: Noord station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.
Rokin station. Photo: Noord station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.

It features seven new stations and connects with existing metro, tram and mainline services at the new Central metro station. Other new stations include: Noord, Noorderpark, Rokin, Vijzelgracht, De Pijp, and Europaplein. Two of these stations are above ground and five are underground.

Construction began back in 2003 but the line’s launch has been put back a number of times.


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Photo: Gemeentelijk Vervoerbedrijf.
Photo: Gemeentelijk Vervoerbedrijf.

Benthem Crouwel Architects designed the seven new stations. In a statement, a spokesperson for the company said: “The task of engineering an underground metro 25m deep in the soggy soil of historical Amsterdam, built on long wooden stilts around 1300, was not an easy one.

“Thanks to a new tunnel drilling technique that was developed in the 1990s it became possible to create tunnels – at certain levels even 30m deep – in Amsterdam’s wet and unstable ground, without affecting the city too much.”

Europaplein station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.
Europaplein station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.

Passengers can travel from the north to the south of the city in just 15 minutes using the line, with a headway of six minutes during peak hours.

The line uses Alstom’s Urbalis 400 communications-based train control and signalling solution.

Noord station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.
Noord station. Photo: Benthem Crouwel Architects/Jannes Linders.

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